Monday, July 24, 2017

The US Navy is Getting Much Closer to an Operational Railgun


The Navy’s futuristic electromagnetic railgun is set to take a major developmental step forward this summer as developers work to increase the number of shots it can fire per minute and the power behind the system.

The railgun has been a pet project for the Navy for more than a decade since early testing of a prototype for a shipboard system began in 2006. The gun uses electromagnetic force to launch projectiles at high speeds, allowing the system to function without the powder mechanism conventional shipboard guns.

In theory, a railgun would be safer and potentially cheaper to fire than traditional weapons. Navy plans have called for installing the railgun on the Navy’s three DDG-1000 Zumwalt-class destroyers, but it’s not clear when that will happen.

For now, officials with the Office of Naval Research are working to build the program up to its target capability envelope.

This summer and into next year, work will focus on increasing the power with which projectiles are fired to the target of 32 megajoules, and increasing what’s known as the rep rate to 10 shots per minute, or one every six seconds, said Dr. Tom Beutner, head of Naval Air Warfare and Weapons for ONR.

link.

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Turkey Moved More Troops Into Qatar

The slow build-up of Turkish soldiers in Qatar has continued, despite their withdrawal being one of the demands that Saudi Arabia and its allies have insisted Doha complies with before they lift their blockade of the emirate.

The Qatari ministry of defence (MoD) announced on 11 July that a fifth instalment of Turkish soldiers had arrived in Doha to join their comrades at the Tariq bin Zayid Battalion base, under the provisions of the military co-operation agreement signed by the two countries. The ministry released photographs showing Turkish troops disembarking from a Qatar Emiri Air Force (QEAF) C-130J-30 transport aircraft.

The Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) did not confirm the statement, but Turkish newspapers reported on the following day that that a 45-strong commando unit affiliated to the Istanbul-based 1st Army Command had arrived in Doha. The Dogan News Agency (DHA) reported that another contingent of about 25 soldiers from an artillery unit would arrive in Qatar between 16 and 19 July with T-155 Fırtına self-propelled howitzers.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Paleolithic Papers #15

Genus Homo:

Long endurance in modern Humans seems to have arisen in the genus Homo around 1 million years ago.

Humans lost strength relative to chimpanzees due to a need for low energetic cost, repetitive motions.

Different times when people are better awake (night owls, early birds, etc) may have increased the human ancestors' chances of survival.

Did a dog domestication take a wrong turn?

A Mesolithic rock shelter's biomarkers might be useful for studies around the world.

How female chimps differ from male on how they acquire meat may shed light on how humanity evolved gender roles.

Old age insomnia might actually be a survival mechanism.

When did music originate in the human line?

Modern Humans (H. sapiens):

The oldest known fossils of modern humans date from around 300 kya and show the diet of that ancient modern human was very meat heavy.  Additionally, the site is mesolithic, further tying our species to the advent of that level of technology.  The fossil raises interesting questions about how modern humans evolved in Africa.

Examining the Omo-Kibish pelvis, one of the oldest known fossils of modern humans.

In the late Pleistocene, PaleoIndians in Peru had an interestingly advanced culture.

A Mesolithic culture in Ethiopia used ochre for thousands of years at one site.

Mesolithic era human remains have been found in South Africa.

Rice domestication has been pushed back to the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary.

The first use of potatoes in North America has been dated to the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary.

Upper Paleolithic behaviors changed based on evidence from an Armenian cave.

Late Paleolithic beads made from Ostrich shells in northern China show evidence of different craftsmen.

It appear the Aboriginals reached Australia 65,000 years ago based on new archaeological evidencea.

Neandertals (H. neanderthalensis):

A commentary on the recent paper about Neandertal diet.

The Apidima 2 hominin is a Neandertal from 160,000 years ago.

The transition from Neandertals to modern human occupation in the Czech Republic.

The transition from Neandertals to modern human occupation in Iran's Zagros Mountains took place between 45,000 to 40,000 years ago.

Dating the Mousterian in France.

Neandertals apparently used toothpicks based on tooth wear evidence.

Rabbits may have disturbed a Neandertal gravesite bringing into question the dating of the remains there.

Mitochondrial DNA suggests Neandertals interbred with a close relative of modern humans between 220,000 to 470,000 years ago.

H. naledi:

Homo naledi chipped its teeth an awful lot.

H. ergaster:

How Homo ergaster might have organized socially due to predation.

META:

The evolution of the hominin ankle and knee.

Examining the depositional environment in South African hominin fossil sites that are paleokarsts.

Increasing aridity and hominin evolution may not be as tightly coupled as originally thought.

When did hominins start eating large amounts of meat?


Sunday, July 16, 2017

Chinese Troops are now Based in Djibouti

China’s People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) has despatched its first troop contingent to Djibouti ahead of the official establishment of the East Asian country’s first military support base in a foreign country.

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Stealth Saga #64

Sixth Generation Fighters:

The USAF Sixth Gen Fighter is likely to be a rather different aircraft than the 5th generation, potentially not even being a traditional fighter at all.

Is America facing an air superiority crisis?

The designer of the J-20 embraces and extends Lockheed's OODA 2.0 concept.

KF-X:

Hanwa unveiled a prototype AESA radar for the KF-X.

TF-X:

The decision on where the TF-X's engine will come from is approaching.

FGFA:

The Russians are trying to reassure the Indians the FGFA will not be inferior to the PAK-FA.

PAK-FA:

Rumors Vietnam is buying the PAK-FA are probably bunk.

The Russians will have two more PAK-FA delivered this year (more on the 'news').

PAK-DP/MiG-41:

The Russians will formally start the replacement for the MiG-35 in 2019 and it has been designated the PAK-DP.

PAK-DA:

Other sources are stating the PAK-DA is delayed.

J-20:

The Chinese did some formation flying with five J-20s, seven J-11s and some AWACS.

The J-20 might make an appearance over Hong Kong.

J-31/FC-31:

The J-31 sorta made an appearance at the Paris air show.

China was attempting to market the FC-31 version.

B-21:

Virginia Rep Wittman is pleased with the progress of the B-21 program and the article hints there are or have been flying prototypes.

The USAF is about to conduct a critical design review for the B-21.

A report was sent to the USAF warning not to make the B-21 nuclear capable when it is unmanned.

F-22:

To restart the F-22 line to make another 194 F-22s will cost $50 billion.

The HASC received a secret report on the subject.

Why the F-22 didn't get the Su-22 kill in Syria.

The F-22 is getting a billion dollar upgrade to allow it to last for more than 40 years more.

The F-22 was to participate in France's Bastille Day.

F-35:

The F-35 went from 'zero to hero.'

On the other hand, others still hate the F-35.

The F-35A and F-35B will be flying together at the Red Flag exercise this year.

The House authorizers only put in for 87 F-35s this year.  The Senate put in for 94.  They will have to reconcile.

The Pentagon announced a contract for 91 F-35s.

Due to the smaller buy than planned, the total acquisition costs have gone up.

Colorado Engineering will be developing GPUs for the Block 4 radar upgrade on the F-35s.

The F-35As at Paris showcased their acrobatics for the airshow.  Some are claiming the F-35 is superior in visual range combat (dog fighting).

The pilots that experienced hypoxia in the F-35 at Luke AFB were flying above FL250.  The USAF was still investigating.

The Luke AFB F-35As returned to flight on June 21st.

Hill AFB F-35As will participate in 4th of July celebrations.

The USAF F-35A engine fire is being blamed on a strong tail wind?

Due to problems with the ALIS software system, some F-35Bs were grounded.  That pause has been lifted.  More info.

The USMC would like another 13 F-35Bs ordered.  And they have.

Watch the F-35Bs land in Okinawa.

An F-35C test fired a sidewinder inverted.

Britain has declared the 207 Squadron the third RAF unit to be converted to using F-35Bs.

Britain will also decide on whether to do a split buy on the types of F-35s in the future.

Germany was given a classified briefing on how to buy F-35s (FMS process).

Israeli F-35s will be declared operational in December.

Italy has the first F-35s with special tail markings.

Rumors claim Japan may equip its F-35s with Norway's Joint Strike Missile.  The Japanese MoD denies them.

Lockheed is about to do a bulk sale of 440 F-35s to 11 countries.

Elbit and Harris will be replacing the heads-up display on the F-35.

Raytheon is making progress on getting work from the F-35 program.

Rockwell Collins has a fix for the so-called green glow of the F-35 helmets.

META:

Russia will finally and formally merge Mikoyan and Sukhoi under the United Aircraft Corporation.

Why the European fighter market is worth fighting for.

Sunday, July 09, 2017

The INF Treaty is About to Collapse

The situation with the INF Treaty is getting worse pretty rapidly. U.S. Congress is moving to include what is known as "INF Treaty Preservation Act" in the National Defense Authorization bill. Judging by the language of the bill, its authors believe that the best way to preserve the INF Treaty is to join Russia in killing it (and to kill the New START extension for good measure). The current version of the bill would establish a U.S. program to develop an INF-range ground-launched cruise missile development program. Other proposals have been circulating as well - the Senate version of the INF Preservation Act mentions active defenses, counterforce capabilities, or things like "facilitating the transfer to allied countries of missile systems with [INF] ranges" (I am told that the plan is that the missiles would come from Israel). And it's not just Congress -- the Pentagon has already developed a set of five or so options that would address the INF violation (Israeli missiles is reportedly one of them).

In short, the process that would lead to destruction of the INF Treaty has been set in motion and at this point fewer and fewer people mention the option of resolving the issue through a discussion with Russia. In fact, a lot of people do not particularly care about the details of the alleged violation or its real military significance. For them, it is very convenient to start with a "blatant treaty violation" and move on to their favorite cause, be that missile defense, dismantlement of New START, or something else.